Case Study

Wheatley Park School x2

The project:

We have installed 195 solar PV panels on Wheatley Park School’s Maths and English blocks, which will generate 42,437kWh per year. The scheme save 20 tonnes of carbon dioxide annually and will help educate the school’s 1005 pupils on renewables and climate change.

Headteacher, Kate Curtis, is really pleased to be working with us:

"It's great to be saving some money in a time of shrinking budgets. It means we will have more available for teaching resources, for maintaining the pupil-teacher ratio and for more creative projects. The Low Carbon Hub scheme is a really fantastic deal for schools. (You are) part of a community which has the capacity to generate electricity, which is good, I think, for their education and their awareness.”

Wheatley Park’s solar panels were funded through our oversubscribed 2015 community share offer, giving staff, parents and local residents the opportunity to own the installation. The funds from the electricity generated give a return to the community who have invested in the panels, as well as helping reduce school bills and enabling future community-benefit projects.

You can read more about the Wheatley installation in a case study for Friends of the Earth here.

Photos / map / Impact

  • Low Res
  • Dsc00068 Maths
  • Dsc00062
  • 48.75 kWp installed capacity
  • 195 Solar panels
  • 42,308 Annual generation (kWh)
  • 20 year agreement to host Low Carbon Hub solar PV project
  • 21 of the school's electricity needs met on-site
  • 25% discount to the site on solar electricity purchased
  • ZERO cost to the school for the term of the project
  • 376 tonnes CO2 emissions to be saved over the project life
  • £20K savings to the school electricity bills over the project life
We were surprised to come back to school in September and see the panels on the Maths department, but felt good that Wheatley Park was generating clean energy for Oxfordshire. It seems a really positive way of using school buildings, and educates all of us to realise that we can stay warm in the winter but at the same time put something back without damaging the environment.

Anon, Sixth Form Pupil

When you’re running a school budget you’d have to make a decision to take money away from young people’s education in that year. Although you’re investing for a long-term future, that’s still quite a drastic step to take in relation to the children who are currently in the school. As soon as we realised there was an opportunity, we were keen to take it. We were aware of other schools that had had similar projects and had benefited so we wanted to join the club, so to speak. It is a share offer so we haven’t had to invest in the capital, which is what we were looking at previously, which made it more or less impossible for us to do anything without some kind of significant grant funding or some more creative model around supporting the funding. It’s great to be saving some money in a time of shrinking budgets. It means we will have more available for teaching resources, for maintaining the pupil-teacher ratio and for more creative projects. The Low Carbon Hub scheme is a really fantastic deal for schools. You are part of a community which has the capacity to generate electricity, which is good, I think, for their education and their awareness. Having more funds available in the school for resources... will make more difference to their education. [This project featured as a national case study with Friends of the Earth. For more details go to: https://www.foe.co.uk/news/headteacher-backs-campaign-let-all-schools-have-solar-panels]

Kate Curtis, Head teacher

We are very impressed with the way all the work has been carried out. From our point of view disruption was minimal and the job was undertaken in a very professional way.

Kevin Heritage, Business and Estate/Facilities Manager

Work with us

  • Adraino Figueiredo Operations Director Low Carbon Hub Team 500
    Adriano Figueiredo
    Operations Director
    01865 246099
    Email me

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